TAG: Whole grains

Oats: A Buyers’ Guide

Oats: A Buyers' Guide

Eating oats regularly helps to protect against a wide variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as well as aiding weight control. There are a number of different oat products available for those who want to incorporate this nutritious whole grain into their diets. Oat groats: Oat groats are hulled oat kernels that can be used in stuffings or cereals. They have a more rounded shape because they have not been sliced or rolled like most oat products. Steel-cut oats/Scotch oats/Irish oats: These oat groats are sliced but not rolled like quicker-cooking oat products, so they’re thicker and… read more

Best Eat Your Oats

Eat Your Oats

  Oats are among the health-promoting superfoods. Study findings reported by the Whole Grains Council and the George Mateljan Foundation suggest that oats reduce the risk of many different illnesses, as well as helping to maintain a healthy weight. Weight control: A study of 204 overweight adults found that eating whole-grain oat-based cereal twice a day helped subjects to reduce their waistlines. A control group eating the same number of calories did not achieve the same waist-circumference reduction. Other research has found that whole grains create a greater feeling of satiety than white bread (which reduces the likelihood of food… read more

Why Barley Is Better

Barley (Hordeum vugare L.) at Gatersleben

Whole grains provide many health benefits, but not everyone likes whole wheat in breads and baked goods. For those who find whole wheat unappealing, there are plenty of other whole grain options, including barley. Barley has an interesting history. In ancient Egypt, it was used in religious ceremonies and in ancient Rome, gladiators were known as Barley Men because they believed that eating barley enhanced their strength and stamina. Barley also formed the basis of the English measuring system whereby an inch was equivalent to three grains of barley placed lengthwise, end to end, and all other measures were built… read more

Gluten-Free Baking

muffins

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, spelt, rye, triticale, and barley. Those with celiac disease (which causes a severe autoimmune reaction to gluten) must avoid gluten completely. Some people also avoid gluten due to allergies or sensitivities. Many people believe that avoiding gluten means avoiding all grains, but there are gluten-free whole grains. These include amaranth, buckwheat, millet, quinoa, rice, sorghum, and teff. Flours made from nuts, beans, peas, and arrowroot are also gluten free. Oats are technically gluten free, but they are often contaminated with wheat at some point while growing or during processing. However, there are companies… read more

Top 10 Antioxidant Foods

Blueberries and Cherry Tomatoes, Jennifer Copley

Antioxidants may help to protect against many diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and macular degeneration, by neutralizing the free radicals that damage cells. Research indicates that it’s far better to get these nutrients from whole foods than supplements. Top antioxidant food sources include: Spices: Cinnamon, turmeric, cloves, ginger, and mustard power are particularly high in antioxidants. Nuts: Walnuts, pecans, pistachios, almonds, and hazelnuts are top nut choices for antioxidant content. Herbs: Oregano takes the top spot for antioxidant power, though peppermint, dill, rosemary, thyme, winter savory, and Vietnamese coriander are good as well. Berries: All colorful berries… read more

Whole Grain Benefits

Whole Grain Health Benefits

Antioxidants protect against the oxidative cell damage that can cause a variety of deadly diseases. Many people are aware that fruits and vegetables contain antioxidants, but few know that whole grains are also rich sources of these beneficial substances. Modern diets are abundant in refined grains such as white flour and white rice, which have been stripped of much of their nutritional value during processing. Whole grains contain the plant’s embryo (germ) and food for that embryo (endosperm), as well as a protective covering (bran). These parts of the grain contain many health-promoting ingredients including antioxidants, dietary fiber, and omega-3… read more