TAG: Vegetables

Homemade Vegetable Chips

Homemade vegetable chips

The health advantages of eating vegetables are plentiful. We all know we should get our daily servings, but sometimes we truthfully would rather have that crunchy, salty bag of potato chips. Not to worry, as vegetables are very flexible foods. Select your favorite sliceable veggies and they can probably be used to replace the not so healthy variety. Homemade chips are easy to make, only requiring slicing, baking and seasoning, and no throw-away bag. These are just a few examples of how to make healthier chips. Beets and sweet potatoes make great chips. Simply wash, pat dry and slice them… read more

Genetically Modified Food

Corn

Genetically modified (GM) foods are produced by plants that have been adapted using cutting edge molecular biology techniques with the goal of creating desirable traits such as pest and disease resistance, herbicide tolerance, faster growth, ability to withstand cold or drought, and improved nutritional content. In the past, such traits were achieved more slowly via selective breeding. GM foods have been promoted as a means of feeding a rapidly expanding world population. Most GM crops are grown by farmers in the U.S., though Canada, China, Argentina, Australia, France, Bulgaria, Germany, Spain, Uruguay, South Africa, Mexico, and Romania also grow GM… read more

Anti-inflammatory Foods

hot peppers

Inflammation is one way that the body defends itself against illness-causing microbes (viruses, bacteria, and fungi), as well as assisting in the repair of damage to muscles and other tissues. However, for many people, the inflammatory process becomes chronic, at which point it can trigger a broad array of health problems including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, arthritis, and diabetes. There are a number of risk factors for chronic inflammation, including smoking, lack of exercise, exposure to toxins, stress, and a diet high in fast foods or processed snack foods. Many of these risk factors have become more common in… read more

Leafy Green Kale

Kale

There are many varieties of Kale, the leafy green we should all get more of. Black kale (also known as cavolo nero, dinosaur kale, dragon tongue, lacinato or Tuscan kale), Curly gray-green kale and red Russian kale, another variety that has red veins and a purplish colour, to name a few. Kale is a member of the cruciferous family of vegetables, so named because their flowers have four petals in the shape of a cross. Cauliflower, cabbage, cress, bok choy, and broccoli are others. Kale is wonderfully nutritious and is one of nature’s best sources of vitamins A, C and… read more

Grow Food in Containers

Growing food in pots

One of the best things that you can do for the environment is to grow your own vegetables and herbs. Food grown organically at home doesn’t require the transportation that contributes to global warming, and it’s free of pesticides, fresher, and usually tastier as well. Many people believe that growing their own produce is not an option because they don’t have yards, but plenty of food plants grow well in containers of various sizes on decks, porches front walks, and driveways. Some produce plants don’t even require very large containers, others can tolerate partial shade, and a few can even… read more

Saving Seeds

Sewing seeds

There are plenty of good reasons to save your own seeds. You’ll save money, help to preserve the genetic diversity of food plants, and develop plant varieties that thrive in the growing conditions you provide and are more resistant to pests and blights. In addition, while agribusiness favors varieties that store well for shipping, home gardeners can select for traits such as great taste and suitability to local climate. When planning your seed collection strategy, keep in mind that some plants only produce seeds in their second year and hybrid plants don’t breed true to parental type – in other… read more

Winter Vegetables

Lettuce

There’s no need to give up on the food garden during fall and winter. Nutritional powerhouses such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, peas, and broad beans can be grown during the cool seasons in many climates and there are plenty of other plants that thrive in cool weather, providing a steady supply of fresh produce. Leafy salad greens, which prefer cooler temperatures, include arugula (salad rocket), cabbage, chard, chervil, chicories (French Endive/Belgian Endive, Radicchio, Sugarloaf), collard greens, coriander (cilantro), kohlrabi, lettuces, mustard greens, parsley, spinach, and winter purslane. Some of these greens will grow throughout the winter in many climates. Root… read more

Top 10 Antioxidant Foods

Blueberries and Cherry Tomatoes, Jennifer Copley

Antioxidants may help to protect against many diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and macular degeneration, by neutralizing the free radicals that damage cells. Research indicates that it’s far better to get these nutrients from whole foods than supplements. Top antioxidant food sources include: Spices: Cinnamon, turmeric, cloves, ginger, and mustard power are particularly high in antioxidants. Nuts: Walnuts, pecans, pistachios, almonds, and hazelnuts are top nut choices for antioxidant content. Herbs: Oregano takes the top spot for antioxidant power, though peppermint, dill, rosemary, thyme, winter savory, and Vietnamese coriander are good as well. Berries: All colorful berries… read more

Growing a Winter Garden

Growing vegetables in winter

Growing your own food is not just for warmer, sunnier months. Produce can be grown during cooler periods with a few materials and sun power. Considering produce found on the shelves throughout colder seasons can sometimes be lackluster and overpriced, a winter garden may be worth cultivating. Though a bit of invention is needed to sustain a garden in cold climates, it can be done. Having one was routine in past eras out of necessity, where some sort of planting had to be going on at all times in order to make sure there would be enough food to eat…. read more

The Recommended Intake

Fruit and vegetables

Nutritionists recommend eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, but most people fall far short of this goal. A serving is: One medium-sized whole fruit One cup of raw leafy vegetables Three-quarters of a cup of vegetable or fruit juice (100% juice) Half a cup of cooked, canned, or frozen produce One-quarter of a cup of dried fruit Eating five fruits or vegetables per day significantly reduces your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, cataracts, osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity, so it’s worth getting into this habit. Here are some easy ways to… read more