TAG: Sea

Sculpture And Movement At Sea

Sculpture And Movement At Sea

Art centered around the world’s oceans can make a strong statement. Zhan Wang is an internationally known artist who has been creating for several decades. One of his more famous works titled the Floating Mountain of Immortals is created from steel formed over natural rock, which is later extracted. The exhibit has shown worldwide, including a stay off the Belgian coast in the North Sea. From far away the formed together objects look like a shiny island. A closer look reveals it is actually a manmade rock that houses many everyday items, fused together for display. The steel island incorporates forms like mythological… read more

Energy Saving Thermal Cooling Is No Mirage

Energy Saving Thermal Cooling Is No Mirage

Homes that incorporate luxury with smart energy saving features can be nice to sight-see, but this one designed by Kois Associated Architects might make your mouth drop. This beautiful dwelling is perfectly in place with its gorgeous backdrop in Tinos Island, Greece. Called the Mirage home, it sits on a rocky hillside staring out at the stunning blue hues of the Aegean Sea. The design completely considered both the surrounding land and sea, situating the home in a way that does not detract from either. An intentional feature created by the way the house sits on its foundation is a nearly… read more

Polluting The Seas

biofouling-on-boat-hull

If you have ever walked by a sea harbour, you may have noticed a few organisms attached to a docked large ship by the waterline. These attachments may be telling of a worse situation that lies beneath the water than the naked eye can sea. These attachments consist of micro-organism, plants, algae, molluscs and other marine organisms, and such attachment is known as biofouling. Biofouling is not a new phenomenon, it can occur on all marine vessels if appropriate anti- fouling measures are not taken. Environmental scientists have long stated that biofouling provides transportation of non-indigenous species of aquatic plant… read more

Could A Robot Jellyfish Save the Ocean?

Robot jellyfish from Virginia Tech

The robot revolution began a decade ago with ‘Asimo’ by Honda. Now, bolder and bolder robots have debuted from likely sources (DARPA, Air Force, etc), and unlikely ones (Kickstarter, MIT, etc). A new aquatic ‘bot from Virginia Tech may one day be used to keep our oceans safe. Nicknamed ‘Cyro’, this five-foot, seven-inches jellyfish robot is a machine to behold. It’s extremely lifelike in its functions and programming, and from a distance could fool even the most veteran of marine researchers. And that’s the main idea. Cyro will one day patrol for illegal dumping, pollution, and spills off our nation’s… read more