TAG: Pollination

Bee Population Reaches A Record Loss

Wild_bee

Over the duration of the 20th century, 50 percent of wild bee species were lost in the U.S. Just this last winter, honey-beekeepers reported an average bee die-off of 50 percent, which is the highest the die-off rate has been in the last forty years. Of all the foods we eat, at least 75 percent rely on the pollination of bees, including blueberries, almonds, and coffee (which is already under ecological strain). This furthermore threatens the existence of  animal species whose diets are comprised solely on berries, nuts, and other pollination dependent fruit and seeds. According to the USDA ,… read more

Urban Bee Keeping

Urban bee keeping

The Opera House in Paris has kept bees for quite some time. The Boston Sea Port Hotel houses hundreds of thousands of bees on its rooftop which help pollinate hundreds of local gardens. Urban bee keeping is a necessity and can help with lower cost of a healthier diet with rooftop gardens. The issue with urban bee keeping is the fear that bees can be a nuisance. Bees actually help to pollinate and in turn create honey. This helps the environment especially in urban cities where metal rooftops grace the open skies. Rather than ugly rooftops we can replace them… read more

Bats: Ecologically Vital

Bats - ecologically vital

Bats can be found on all continents except Antarctica. They fulfill three ecological roles that are highly beneficial to humans: pollinating food plants, dispersing seeds, and controlling insect populations. More than 300 fruit plant species require bats for pollination, including bananas, guavas, and mangos. Without bats, there would also be no Tequila, as the Agave plant from which it’s derived depends on bats for pollination. In addition to the pollination services they provide, bats play a critical role in the seeding of tropical forests, which rely upon fruit-eating animals for seed dispersal. When animals consume fruit, they protect seeds from… read more