TAG: Poaching

An Animal-Friendly Common Sense Solution

An Animal-Friendly Common Sense Solution

Once you learn about the environmental costs of not recycling, it seems like common sense to try and recycle what you can, when you can. One company has figured out a way to help a city wide problem while taking care of recycling the large amounts of plastic water bottles that are used. Istanbul, Turkey reportedly has a huge concentration of stray animals. In attempts to raise awareness to the approximately 150,000 strays that roam the streets of the densely populated city, a company called Pugedon came up with the idea of installing outdoor machines that will dispense pet food and water. In… read more

The Effects of The Illegal Ivory Trade

The Effects of The Illegal Ivory Trade

Large numbers of elephants are slain for their ivory tusks everyday, and the numbers are on the sharp increase. Making big money for poachers and enticing collectors, the illegal ivory trade renders devastating effects. Places that have been listed as major contributors of illegal ivory sales include Thailand, Kenya, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania, Malaysia, the Philippines, China, and Vietnam. Although there are many other countries that also share this problem, central Africa has been regarded as the region with the largest number of illegal activity. One kilo of ivory can sell for at least $3,000 U.S. from these zones…. read more

Rhinos Could Be Extinct Within 20 Years

Rhino Poaching

The rhinoceros is one of nature’s most unique and beautiful beasts. It forms part of the so called ‘Big 5’ animals that are usually the main attraction in many Sub-Saharan Africa game reserves. The beauty of the rhino is also its curse, the horn it carries is synonymous to a death sentence for the beasts. The poaching watchdog website Stop Rhino Poaching reports that between 2008 to 17th July 2012 there have been 1 267 reported rhino poaching incidents in South Africa alone. Humane Society International further reports that the African black rhino is critically endangered, with a population of less… read more