TAG: Petroleum

Art For Ransom In The Oceans

Art For Ransom In The Oceans

Recycled art from marine litter is an in your face reminder of manmade effluence. Ocean debris and water pollution are unacceptable proceedings of an unnaturally occupied culture. Artists who use the oceans’ trash as their bittersweet mediums help to spread the message of how large the consequences of careless disposal are. The nonprofit Washed Ashore Project is a conceptualization of the Artula Institute for Arts and Environmental Education. The project takes the issue into the forefront of the community through outreaches and volunteers. By utilizing the arts to communicate and educate the public about the devastating effects of plastics and… read more

Ten Facts About Petroleum You Probably Don’t Know

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For the past century, we have used oil almost exclusively to power our planes, trains, and automobiles, but there are quite a few random uses for the viscous substance that will surprise you. 1. It’s used to make plastic bags Oil is used to make plastics, and more specifically, the small sandwich bags you carry to work with you. The oil used to make just one such plastic bag could power an automobile for 11 meters. Think about that for a second. 2. It’s a chemical in fertilizer Yes, the same fertilizer you use for gardening likely contains oil in it. And quick spoiler… read more

Just A Normal Day Wearing Chicken Feathers

Just A Normal Day Wearing Chicken Feathers

Referred to as the urban chicken craze, the recent upsurge in popularity of keeping chickens has invaded many cities. Fresh eggs, natural insect control around the yard and the urge to bring a bit of the farm to the city are all reasons to own chickens. However, scientist Yiqi Yang has found another way in which chickens are naturally useful, and it involves their feathers. Turns out, Yang has actually developed a way to make yarn from a combination of chicken feathers and rice straw, which are normally discarded leftovers from the farming trade. He came up with this textile… read more