TAG: Ocean

The Beauty Of Impermanence

The Beauty Of Impermanence

Is it possible to make the beach even more beautiful? For artist Andres Amador, it is. Amador is a sand artist who creates surreal beach murals, also known as playa paintings, which he refers to as earthscape art. Taking advantage of the low tide, Amador rakes the sand into patterns and generates geometrical forms as he engraves intricate designs into the beach shore. He also uses a rope to help make the patterns. The raking reveals the wet sand underneath and creates a notable varied toned presentation in the appearance of the sand. The patterns take over the beachfront and observers… read more

Oceanic Architecture Of The Future

Oceanic Architecture Of The Future

Elaborate and awe-inspiring architectural concept designs don’t have to be purely land based. Some spectacular ideas for structures with sea legs are also floating around, literally. Aptly referred to as the Floating Island from AT Design Office, this concept design for an ocean based residential, entertainment and business district is an interesting proposal. The manmade island containing the rafted metropolis would stretch for miles. The foundation is constructed of hexagon slating, and underneath the flooring is a system of connected roads and walking paths that provide transportation outlets. Occupants have the option to be either above or below the ocean’s surface. A… read more

Shrimp Is The New Plastic

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A solution to the world’s plastic overload may have been found in a shrimp. Or actually, in the shrimp’s composition. A research team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University are on to something huge. They have developed an interesting procedure for making bioplastic that is completely biodegradable and could someday replace commercial plastics that are not sustainable. The process uses a substance called chitin, which is an abundant natural source that can be collected from certain shelled organisms. Examples of the organic material can be seen in the protective coverings on shrimp and other crustaceous… read more

The Plastic Peril Island

The Plastic Peril Island

Imagine an island, floating in the aqua blue waters of the North Pacific Ocean. And when you conjure up the image of that island, it probably isn’t a mobile one constructed of plastic and debris. Yes, this floating plastic island is called The Trash Vortex and it is a reality. Explored by Greenpeace, you may have heard that it is swirling around in the North Pacific gyre right now, which is only one of 5 chief gyres or pools of ocean currents. And the trash problem undoubtedly has crept into the other circulating areas as well. This one receives so… read more

Capturing The Perfect Wave

Capturing The Perfect Wave

Clark Little, a surfer and photographer, has been making a lot of waves in recent years. The amazing views captured by the water adventurer and shutterbug are reason for pause. Taking observers straight into the eye of ocean waves, Little transforms the way we see the water. His trademark breathtaking shots, referred to as shorebreak photography, offer a dreamlike glimpse into the dancing and crashing waves that many of us will never experience. Interestingly, Little’s initial idea to start capturing these incredible shots came from a spousal request to hang up some artwork to liven up a bland bedroom wall. Not… read more

Commercial Airline Flights To Monitor Weather

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Beginning with a fleet of Southwest Airline commercial jets, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Aeronautical Radio Incorporated (ARINC), will install a series of water vapor sensors on the jets to map weather conditions. These sensors will provide data back to the NOAA and other agencies, allowing them to predict weather patterns and monitor climate change. Check out a video explanation: This is a first for the commercial airline industry, and also a giant innovative step forward for the natural science field. Southwest’s fleet of jets will be able to cover our nation’s airspace faster than individual jets… read more

Our Lives Depend Upon It

Oceans

After years of polluting our oceans we now appreciate the many benefits they provide to humans. Essential nutrition, climate regulation, and oxygen generation are just some of the ways in which our lives are effected. The oceans face a constant threat of pollution and the creatures that live beneath the waves of habitat loss. The sad part is these effects can last decades and some may be irreversable. Oceans and coastlines provide shelter to 40 percent of the global population, help to support 350 million jobs and contribute more than $3 trillion to the world’s material wealth each year. The… read more

Artificial and Natural Alterations to the Earth

Artificial and Natural Alterations to the Earth

The earth’s water and land surfaces have changed over time, some by natural means and some by the exact opposite. Some distinctive formations are conversation striking structures, and whether they are geologically produced by Mother Nature or synthetically constructed by man, the source that can cause such a physical presence can be just as astounding. Covered in ice during cold months, the Ekati Mine in Canada operates even under completely frozen road conditions. The mine is a diamond bonanza, and so far it has birthed 40 million or so carats of them. Though mines can be major sources of income, when they are… read more

Could A Robot Jellyfish Save the Ocean?

Robot jellyfish from Virginia Tech

The robot revolution began a decade ago with ‘Asimo’ by Honda. Now, bolder and bolder robots have debuted from likely sources (DARPA, Air Force, etc), and unlikely ones (Kickstarter, MIT, etc). A new aquatic ‘bot from Virginia Tech may one day be used to keep our oceans safe. Nicknamed ‘Cyro’, this five-foot, seven-inches jellyfish robot is a machine to behold. It’s extremely lifelike in its functions and programming, and from a distance could fool even the most veteran of marine researchers. And that’s the main idea. Cyro will one day patrol for illegal dumping, pollution, and spills off our nation’s… read more

Deep Water Gas Emissions

NOAA

NOAA ocean explorers used an advanced multibeam sonar mapping system on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in November to discover and map the first deep water gas seeps found off the U.S. Atlantic Coast north of Cape Hatteras. The seeps were found at water depths greater than 3,300 feet. Based on preliminary information, scientists believe the seeps are likely emitting methane gas. Locating seeps with this advanced technology will expand opportunities for researchers to study how seeps in the deep ocean environment affect ocean chemistry. NOAA’s use of advanced technology to discover seeps will benefit other agencies, including the U.S. Geological… read more