TAG: Natural Sweeteners

Healthy Shades of Sweet

Stevia

The ongoing demand for sugar alternatives is evident in the vast markets for both artificial and natural sweeteners. Though there exist ‘natural’ sweeteners like honey and agave nectar neither contains any real nutritious value. In fact, they can be as hazardous to your health as sugar. Luckily, with these ‘bad’ sugars, nature has also provided a few sweeteners that are safe and beneficial to your health. Stevia is nature’s answer to calorie free sweeteners. Extracted from the Stevia rebaudiana leaf, it is 400 times sweeter than sugar. Because of this, Stevia can achieve the same amount of sweet as sugar… read more

Nutritious Molasses

Nutritious molasses

Molasses is a nutritionally concentrated by-product of the sugar refining process. The nutrients that white sugar loses during processing are retained in molasses. Molasses is a source of calcium, manganese, potassium, and iron. In fact, it actually provides more iron than red meat with fewer calories and no fat. There are several different types of molasses. Light molasses (also known as Barbados), which is less viscous and higher in sugar, is produced the first time the sugar cane is boiled during processing. Dark molasses, a thicker molasses created during the second sugar cane boiling cycle, is darker in color and… read more

Natural Sweeteners

Natural Sweeteners

There are many natural sweeteners, all of which add their own unique flavors and textures. Cane or turbinado sugar is made from the sugarcane plant, this whole, unrefined sugar has a slight brownish tint because the health-promoting molasses has not been extracted from it. Beet sugar is similar to cane sugar but is derived from beets. Molasses: is rich in many beneficial nutrients including calcium and iron. Molasses can be used to replace up to half the sugar in many recipes. Choose dark or blackstrap molasses, which are more nutritious. Honey is environmentally friendly because it requires minimal processing and… read more

A Healthy Alternative?

agave plant

Agave (pronounced ah-GAH-vay) nectar is derived from the agave plant, a spiky cactus native to Mexico that is also the source of Tequila. Agave is approximately 84% fructose, the sugar that gives fruits and vegetables their sweetness. Agave nectar is similar to honey, but not as thick, and it’s higher in calories than white sugar. It’s also 1.5 times as sweet as regular sugar, which means that if you want to use it to replace sugar in baking, you need to reduce the amount. To substitute agave nectar for white sugar, for each cup of sugar called for by the… read more