TAG: Japan

Hipped Roof House With Engawa Feature

Hipped Roof House With Engawa Feature

There are many different roof styles to consider when building or buying a home, and each has benefits and disadvantages to their design. Located in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, the Oyane no ie project by Naoi Architecture & Design Office is a great example of how a creative spin can make a huge difference in a home’s presentation. This roof design is a striking variation of a basic hipped roof. This kind of roof is normally more involved to construct than others, but is not overly difficult to actually build since all of the sides slope downward to connect the walls. Hip roofs are… read more

Once Only Tea Set

Paper Tea Set Origami by Yuya vs. Design

Yuya vs. Design is a design studio based in The Netherlands, directed by Japanese designer Yuya Ushida. A graduate from renowned Design Academy of Eindhoven, Ushida creates objects using exclusively everyday materials and traditional building techniques. Born in 1975 in Nagoya, Japan, Yuya Ushida was the child of the manager of an ironworks and was constantly exposed to a creative busy environment. He always enjoyed making things with his hands and his motto is still “to make objects which make people happy” adding a playful critical edge to his designs. Ushida realized from an early stage that his own interest… read more

In Bloom

In Bloom

Cherry trees are a beautiful display of the onset of springtime. They are native to Japan as well as China and Korea, but the striking trees can be found across the globe. Plantings of cherry trees were initiated in 1912 as a symbol of enduring friendship to the U.S. from Japan. The line of original seeds that were sown during this time still continues to bloom today. The National Cherry Blossom Festival is an ongoing celebration of this gift. For more on the history of cherry trees in the U.S., see the National Park Service. The blossoming plant, or sakura,… read more

What You’ve Heard About Fukushima Is Wrong

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The tsunami that hit Japan three years ago and caused the Fukushima disaster is still making headlines today, in part because journalists have nothing better to write about. You may have seen some graphs or timelines in recent weeks that showed the “spread of radiation into the ocean” from the Fukushima plant. I’m here to tell you that those graphs are garbage. Take a look at this video from D News, and discover for yourself: Next time you hear something sensational or alarming on the news, do yourself a favor, and research the facts. I’ve found that I’m called out… read more

Growing Concern For Uninhabitable Fukushima Zones

Growing Concern For Uninhabitable Fukushima Zones

Radiation detectors are an unfortunate commonplace item in the areas affected by the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan. Daily worry over what the current levels are sound as routine as a weather check. Although, checking the forecast certainly isn’t as worrisome as the constant anxiety of living in and revolving your activities around amounts of unsafe radioactivity. The reality of living in the toxic air that looms over the  radioactive zones is hard to imagine. Coverage on RT News reports that there may have actually been damage at the plant a decade or so before the Tsunami disaster occurred. Numbers of… read more

Japanese MagLev Train Hits 310 MPH

Japanese MagLev Train Hits 310 MPH

The future of rail transportation, at least in Japan, is a levitating train capable of reaching speeds in excess of 300 miles per hour. The most recent trial of the fastest maglev train in the world, the L-Zero, on a 26-mile test track in Japan, demonstrated its ability to double the speed that current “bullet trains” can achieve. The L-Zero, which uses magnetic levitation technology to float just above the tracks, thereby reducing friction and increasing potential speeds, is the latest in a series of designs aimed to be put into use between Tokyo and Nagoya by 2027. The 286… read more

Uncovering Under-Water “Mystery Circles”

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In the perilous waters of Amami Oshima, Southern Japan, sea beds lay inscribed with ornate circles of a once mysterious origin. Within these circles intricate sweeps and grooves create shapely mounds of sand that come together and part to constellate geometric works of art that mirror the symbolic art of ancient Celts just as much as they emulate crop circles. The “mystery circles” were first discovered 20 years ago, some 80 ft below the water’s surface. Images of the circles were captured by Yoji Ookata, a deep sea photographer, while diving in the southern tip of Japan’s coast. Having obtained his… read more

Giant Rice Paddy Art

Giant Rice Paddy Art

Every year hundreds of farmers and enthusiastic locals gather together to create gigantic rice paddy art in Japan. Tanbo Art is a way of expression, a local tradition that started back in 1993 and consists of using rice fields as a canvas to create the most amazing illustrations from different shades of the plant. It started as a way to revitalize the rice village of Inakadate, in Aomori prefecture, and it has now been extended to various areas around the island of the raising sun. For the first 8 years, the farmers created a simple picture of Mount Iwaki, but… read more

Adorable Tiny Origami

Adorable Tiny Origami

Origami is the traditional Japanese art of paper folding. It is said to have started in the 17th century AD and was popularized outside of Japan in the mid-1900s. Its name comes from the word ori meaning “folding”, and kami meaning “paper“, and it is now a modern form of art. Origami is made by transforming a flat sheet of paper into a sculptural design, through folding and sculpting techniques that requires no cuts or glue. The best thing about it is that anyone can do it, instructions are easily found and the only thing needed is a square sheet of paper, and dedication…. read more

Eco-Conscious Company Ignores Pleas to Stop Shark Killing

White_shark

MUJI JAPAN, a company that self-proclaims to follow eco-conscious practices, has ignored the outcries of over 54,000 of their customers and petitioners to stop the careless slaughter of sharks for use in shark fin soup, which is sold in the company’s stores. Every year, some 100 million sharks are intentionally killed by humans. A majority of them are killed for their fins, which are often used to make shark fin soup. Although this had lead to a 90 percent-plus decline in many shark species, it is allowed to continue – because somewhere people fancy the novelty killing rare, unseemly flesh… read more