TAG: Hurricane Sandy

Findings On Fire Island

Fire island

Fire Island is the large center island of the outer barrier islands adjacent to the south shore of Long Island, New York. Fire Island is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long but ranges between only 520 and 1,300 feet (160 and 400 m) wide. During powerful storms like Hurricane Sandy, waves punch a hole the dune, bringing sand inland. On Fire Island, elevations on the beach dropped by as much as 10 feet (3.5 m), while inland areas gained about 3 feet (1 m) in height in places, said Hilary Stockdon, a United States Geological Survey (USGS) research oceanographer. The entire… read more

Hurricane WiFi

Editorial Attribution - Anton Oparin / Shutterstock.com

As Hurricane Sandy battered the Northeast, power outages wreaked havoc on telecommunications networks, knocking out cell phone usage by the millions. If a future hurricane triggers similar failures, regulators say they have a potential solution with floating wireless antennas from balloons or drones. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is exploring the use of such airborne technology to restore communications after disasters. Beaming 3G or Wi-Fi signals from the sky may be especially useful to emergency responders in the immediate aftermath of a hurricane. Though not as severe as Hurricane Katrina, the damage to telecommunications networks after Hurricane Sandy was significant. After… read more

The US To Embrace Biking?

Cycling in the City

As a potential solution to combat the rising dangers and costs associated with climate change, many have advocated for a biking revolution in America, similar to European biking cultures such as Amsterdam and Copenhagen. The benefits are numerous: less traffic on the roads making it easier for public and commercial transportation to get where they need to go; less carbon emissions from vehicles; a healthier population; cheaper fuel costs, etc. There are problems associated with a biking revolution, but most of those are logistical issues such as bike paths and how to incorporate travel via bicycle into the current transportation… read more

Occupy Sandy

Occupy Sandy - helping America

Hurricane Sandy is partially the effects of greenhouse gases and mass pollution of the earth. To add to the bad news, the hurricane itself can cause mass damage such as rising sea levels, erosion, and waste from debris. It is important to have scientists working in these areas to help. Just as equally important are the cleanup efforts like ‘Occupy Sandy‘. Occupy Sandy is a coordinated relief effort to help distribute resources & volunteers to help neighborhoods and people affected by Hurricane Sandy. We are a coalition of people & organizations who are dedicated to implementing aid and establishing hubs… read more

Post Sandy Bike Generator

Bike Generator

The Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, also known as MoRUS, has put an OWS bike generator to work which is now getting battery-depleted phone-owners back online. Morus along with C-Squat were able to save the OWS Bike generator from the flooded basement due to Hurricane Sandy. MoRUS has the bike generators placed at Avenue C between 9th and 10th Streets. These bike generators have helped to let people charge their phones and enable contact with their families. Some of these individuals have been without power for days. Meanwhile the residents of C-Squat have set up two grills and are receiving… read more

Reckless Endangerment

Environmental policy, US election

There is only so much a reasonable perspective can allow for ridiculous and inane policy proposals, and every single line that has been drawn has been crossed by Mitt Romney and the Romney campaign. While there is time for unbiased criticism of policy, there comes a point when an event proves a policy so incorrect, and so out of touch with reason, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to justify considering it legitimate. Hurricane Sandy is an event which does all those things, and though devastating, it has shown the policies proposed by Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan are… read more

NASA Nailed It

Effects of Hurricane Sandy

Six years ago, scientists at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York warned the city of the vulnerability to hurricane impacts in a changing climate. It was calculated that with a 1.5 foot rise in sea levels, a worst-case-scenario Category 3 hurricane could submerge the vast majority of the city, including “the Rockaways, Coney Island, much of southern Brooklyn and Queens, portions of Long Island City, Astoria, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens, lower Manhattan, and eastern Staten Island from Great Kills Harbor north to the Verrazano Bridge.” These findings came on the heels of the release of… read more

Questions Raised By Sandy

Devastation of Hurricane Sandy

Obviously, Hurricane Sandy has, and continues, to wreak havoc on the eastern U.S. coastline, and it cannot be denied it is a big storm. Climate scientists, along with hurricane researchers, in their endeavors to learn more about the relationship between climate and hurricanes, have begun to ask critical questions about the impact of climate change. The first step though has been to acknowledge whether climate change has an impact on the size of the storm, or if it was just a naturally occurring large storm. The science is still out on that question (apparently), but there are scientists who have… read more