TAG: growing food

Nature Isn’t What It Used To Be

Nature's changed

Human relationships with nature are vastly different now to what they were even a generation ago. We have moved from a utilitarian relationship to romantic attachment to the new world of electronic detachment. Today, many people live in a world that is technologically advanced yet environmentally severed. Where once people spent more than half their life outdoors, today so many of us are glued – from breakfast to bedtime – to an increasing myriad of screens. Today, nature is mediated, modified, and managed out of people’s lives. For example, publicly and privately many people no longer acknowledge (or in some… read more

Winter Vegetables

Lettuce

There’s no need to give up on the food garden during fall and winter. Nutritional powerhouses such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, peas, and broad beans can be grown during the cool seasons in many climates and there are plenty of other plants that thrive in cool weather, providing a steady supply of fresh produce. Leafy salad greens, which prefer cooler temperatures, include arugula (salad rocket), cabbage, chard, chervil, chicories (French Endive/Belgian Endive, Radicchio, Sugarloaf), collard greens, coriander (cilantro), kohlrabi, lettuces, mustard greens, parsley, spinach, and winter purslane. Some of these greens will grow throughout the winter in many climates. Root… read more

The Sustainable Garden

Chives, Jennifer Copley

Here are five tips for those who care about the environment and would like to develop their gardens with sustainability in mind. 1. Compost: Instead of throwing away food scraps and plant trimmings and buying plastic bags filled with compost, make your own. There are a number of methods, the simplest of which is to bury kitchen scraps, leaves, and trimmings from healthy plants in the garden and let the process occur naturally. You can also use a compost bin or tumbler, a worm composting system, or a bokashi composting system to speed up the process. Don’t add meat, dairy… read more