TAG: Food

What Really Happens To Food In The Microwave?

What Really Happens To Food In The Microwave?

Some experts say that microwave cooking is not a healthful way to heat foods. Some studies have even shown that using microwaves may decrease the nutritional value of foods. However, many households have one. So, what does microwave cooking really do to your food? First off, how do microwaves work? Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation. Magnetrons, found inside microwave ovens, produce microwave radiation by discharging pulses of microwaves which bounce off of things they come into contact with, yielding an amount of energy. The process affects the water molecules that are found inside of food and increases the temperature…. read more

Flu Fighting Foods

Flu Fighting Foods

With the flu season having started earlier than usual this year it is vital to stay healthy. These are a few foods to help your body ward off the bugs this time. Garlic: Garlic can be added to just about any dish and it will almost always enhance the flavor. Garlic has been found to have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activity. Yogurt: The digestive tract is one of your biggest immune organs, so keep disease-causing germs out with probiotics and prebiotics, found in naturally fermented foods like yogurt. Frozen yogurt is a great option also instead of the sugar loaded ice… read more

Invite Rosemary to Dinner

rosemary-jungle

Rosemary is a wonderfully pungent herb that offers a broad array of health benefits. It stimulates the immune system, improves digestion and circulation, and has anti-inflammatory properties (inflammation is implicated in many health problems ranging from asthma to arthritis). Evidence suggests that the scent of rosemary even boosts brain performance. Rosemary can be purchased fresh and stored in the fridge (you can extend its life by wrapping it in a slightly damp paper towel). You can also freeze rosemary by chopping the leaves into ice cube trays, covering them with water, and keeping them in the freezer. These rosemary cubes… read more

Oats: A Buyers’ Guide

Oats: A Buyers' Guide

Eating oats regularly helps to protect against a wide variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as well as aiding weight control. There are a number of different oat products available for those who want to incorporate this nutritious whole grain into their diets. Oat groats: Oat groats are hulled oat kernels that can be used in stuffings or cereals. They have a more rounded shape because they have not been sliced or rolled like most oat products. Steel-cut oats/Scotch oats/Irish oats: These oat groats are sliced but not rolled like quicker-cooking oat products, so they’re thicker and… read more

Winter Seasonal Eating

Winter Seasonal Eating

Seasonal eating has become increasingly popular for a number of reasons. Fresh produce that has not been shipped from far away tends to be tastier, more nutritious, and significantly better for the environment. However, when contemplating the switch to a more seasonal diet, many people are concerned that they will have no fruits and vegetables to eat during the winter months. Fortunately, there are plenty of colorful, fresh produce options throughout the cold season. Root vegetables: Root vegetables such as carrots, beets, potatoes, and yams grow well in cold weather and store nicely. Roasted root vegetables drizzled with olive oil… read more

Artists Envision Human-Algae Symbiosis

Artists Envision Human-Algae Symbiosis

In the future, humans may be able to enter into a personal symbiotic relationship with algae by using “new bodily organs” that can host living algae systems. Our booming population and dwindling water and soil resources may cause us to explore extremely different approaches to food, and the design duo of Michiko Nitta and Michael Burton proposes that one answer may lie in the construction of new organs for the body, perhaps containing a culture of algae that we both feed and eat. “Algaculture designs a new symbiotic relationship between humans and algae. It proposes a future where humans will… read more

An Aquaponic Farm in a Shipping Container

An Aquaponic Farm in a Shipping Container

To showcase what can be done for local food production in an urban setting anywhere in the city, Kate Hofman and Tom Webster built a combination vertical farm and aquaponics system into an upcycled shipping container, called the GrowUp Box. “We want to show how fresh food can be grown anywhere in the city in a way that is ecologically sustainable and commercially scalable. For us, aquaponics is the technology that can make that vision a reality – by producing fresh fish and vegetables in a recirculating farming system.” – GrowUp Box With the help of some crowdfunding on Kickstarter,… read more

Food For The Future

Food For The Future

In 2011, the Environmental Working Group released a report comparing the environmental impacts of various protein sources. The study found that lamb, beef, cheese, pork, and farmed salmon are the worst for the environment in terms of greenhouse gases produced. With the exception of farmed salmon, they also require the most inputs (feed, fuel, water, pesticides, chemical fertilizers, etc.) and generate the most manure. Turkey, chicken, canned tuna, and eggs also scored highly for greenhouse gas emissions. Where do all these greenhouse gas emissions come from? A lot of this pollution is caused by feed production and the nitrogen dioxide… read more

Nutritious Molasses

Nutritious molasses

Molasses is a nutritionally concentrated by-product of the sugar refining process. The nutrients that white sugar loses during processing are retained in molasses. Molasses is a source of calcium, manganese, potassium, and iron. In fact, it actually provides more iron than red meat with fewer calories and no fat. There are several different types of molasses. Light molasses (also known as Barbados), which is less viscous and higher in sugar, is produced the first time the sugar cane is boiled during processing. Dark molasses, a thicker molasses created during the second sugar cane boiling cycle, is darker in color and… read more

Marvellous Maple Syrup

Marvellous Maple Syrup

Obtained from the sap of red, black, silver, and sugar maple trees in certain regions of North America, maple syrup is less calorific and richer in minerals than honey and healthier than white sugar. Maple syrup provides important minerals such as manganese, which boosts antioxidant activity, and zinc, which promotes heart health and reproductive health (especially for men). Both minerals also aid immune function. There are several types of maple syrup. In the United States, they are categorized using U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grades. Grade A maple syrups include Light, Medium, and Dark Amber types. Lighter maple syrup has… read more