TAG: Environment

Five Amazing Science Videos From List 25

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Tired of scrolling through your Facebook/Twitter feeds? Have you read everything from the front page of Reddit and are waiting for new content to make its way to the top? Perhaps you’re not in the mood to play the “What Should I Watch On Netflix” game at the moment. If this sounds like you, then perhaps you’ll enjoy these short and sweet videos that’ll send some science your way from List 25. 25 Unsolved Scientific Mysteries That Will Leave You Scratching Your Head Do you ever wonder why you need sleep? Why you dream? And just what is that “Dark… read more

Let’s Work Together To Make A Change

Science Law and the Environment

The law and science are two separate fields, mutually independent of the other, however often there are instances when the two fields must work together for a common greater good. Preservation and promotion of the environment is one such instance when scientific and legal efforts should work in concert to achieve a positive outcome. Science explains why and how certain environmental phenomena occur, it lends insight into the scientific processes that have led to the current climate and environmental crises that we face today. More than that, science is instrumental in offering a pool of potential solutions to the problems… read more

Building An Olympic Dream At An Environmental Cost

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Five years ago when Sochi was selected to serve as the venue for the 2014 Winter Olympics, there were concerns of environmental damage that might happen during construction of the main stadium. Today, it appears that those concerns were well founded, and completely avoidable as well. Considering Russia’s lax stance on eco conservation though, one is not to be surprised to discover damage being done to nearby ecosystems. A report by The Guardian a few months ago documented some of the side effects of building an Olympic Dream — a dust-covered village, harmful chemicals being released, fields of debris, and… read more

These Five Foods Don’t Have A Shelf Life

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In our modern times of artificial preservation, these five natural foods defy the space-time continuum and keep unspoiled through the ages. Honey Discovered in the tombs of ancient Egyptian pyramids were found pots of honey, all of them several thousand years old but still edible today. The honey had been covered securely in their pots, which definitely played a contributing factor in its seemingly eternal shelf life. Since honey is a sugar, its chemical properties allow it to suck up moisture in the most dry of areas, where organisms that could spoil the honey would not be able to survive… read more

Shower and use half of the water

Hollow Water Showers

Taking the steps to reduce water usage when showering or bathing is difficult, especially for those with children or larger households. We search for ways to discipline ourselves and watch our dependency on water, but usually give up and continue on as before. The appliance market is full of “low-flow shower heads” that most of the time end up proving completely useless. Countries with strict water policies, and drought prone nations, could certainly use an alternative option to the numerous faux conservative shower nozzles circulating the retail market. Thankfully, the time of limiting ourselves is nearly over. A New Zealand… read more

Are There Any Positives To Our Impact On Earth?

Are There Any Positives To Our Impact On Earth?

It is naïve to think that human experiences have not altered the earth’s natural processes. Our daily activities have, in fact, been an irreversible detriment to many of the planet’s way of doing things. The field of environmental health seeks to identify how our surroundings affect human health and the environment. Research in this area uncovers many concerns about our relationship to our surroundings, but could there in fact be some positives to the human impact? The pressing question isn’t whether or not we have altered things, but what exactly is the full effect of our modifications. How does if effect… read more

Our Deteriorating Natural Capital

Natural Capital

Thanks to the industrial revolution, the modern economy has afforded unprecedented material gains for humankind. We live in a wealthy world. But whilst our ability to buy fancy cars and the latest gadgets may temporarily satisfy our egos, the price we now pay is far greater than the crunch on our credit cards. Since the time of Adam Smith (forefather of the industrial revolution), more of the natural world has been destroyed than throughout all previous human history. As Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins and L.Hunter Lovins highlight in their book, Natural Capitalism: Creating the next industrial revolution (2000): “While industrial… read more

How to Benefit from Botany

485px-Botany

Botany, which can be defined as the study of plants, is one of the main disciplines of biology. For hundreds of years, the observation of plant life has helped scientists unearth the nature of historical development. Botany has provided insight into the diets of early human settlers, and the hunter-gatherers that came before them. It has also enabled the study and use of plant properties for medicinal purposes. But botany isn’t limited to work in laboratories, nor is the practice exclusive to professional scientists. Plant life can be, with a little practice and curiosity, accessible to the observation of ordinary… read more

A New Kind of Economy

Green-Economy-Hand-Shake

The essence of a Green economy – genuine well-being – subscribes to dimensions in Adam Smith’s An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 1776 that reach beyond the rampaging misuse of his economic treatise through modern industrialisation. You see, Adam Smith was a keen observer of human nature. In 1759, while Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow, Smith published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. In this work, he identified the individual conscience and “fellow feeling” (ie. sympathy with others) as the requisite balance to self-love. He believed that in the pursuit of… read more

Hundertwasser’s Inspiring Architecture

Hundertwasser’s Inspiring Architecture

Artist and architect Friedensreich Hundertwasser is often referred to as the father of green roof designs. Born in 1928, his given name was Friedrich Stowasser, which he later changed. His architecture is widely celebrated for its unexpected appearance and original designs. He was drawn to the sea and nature, and this is reflected in his paintings and buildings. The unusual use of lines in his architectural works does not conform to rigid styles or rules. Taking notes from the perfect irregularities found in natural landscapes, he created visually marvelous spaces that are full of color and character. This snippet from… read more