TAG: Coral reefs

Art For Ransom In The Oceans

Art For Ransom In The Oceans

Recycled art from marine litter is an in your face reminder of manmade effluence. Ocean debris and water pollution are unacceptable proceedings of an unnaturally occupied culture. Artists who use the oceans’ trash as their bittersweet mediums help to spread the message of how large the consequences of careless disposal are. The nonprofit Washed Ashore Project is a conceptualization of the Artula Institute for Arts and Environmental Education. The project takes the issue into the forefront of the community through outreaches and volunteers. By utilizing the arts to communicate and educate the public about the devastating effects of plastics and… read more

Stress Tests for Coral Reefs

Coral stresses

Often called “the rainforests of the ocean”, coral reefs enrich our planet with aquatic life. The coral itself is an animal that hosts a large variety of organisms. They serve as a source of food and shelter to sponges, jellyfish, sea anemones, sea turtles, clams, crabs, shrimp, starfish, oysters and sea urchins – to name a few. Coral reefs are important for a variety of reasons. In addition to providing refuge to marine life, coral reefs protect coastlines against erosion. They also act as sensitive indicators of water quality. This informs us of the overall quality of the eco system…. read more

Underwater Worlds

Underwater Worlds

Many artists grab our attention with their displays or messages, but what if their work isn’t readily available to be viewed by the public eye? Land based artists present their creativity in various ways, however when your work is largely underwater that may present a challenge in getting it to the observer. That is, unless you are Jason deCaires Taylor, whose astonishing underwater sculptures are internationally renowned. His famous works have appeared in several documentaries, and seeing them come to life in their watery worlds is quite impressive. While placing foreign items like sculptures into the water may at first… read more

A Swarm of Robots Could Repair Coral Reefs

coralbot

A swarm of autonomous intelligent robots, or coralbots, could be put to work repairing and restoring coral reefs in areas that have been damaged by weather, human negligence, or destructive fishing practices. Coral reefs are an incredibly important part of the ocean ecosystem, providing food and shelter for many organisms under the sea, as well as providing a living for hundreds of millions of people around the world. When coral reefs are damaged, they can be given a headstart in restoration by the transplantation of healthy pieces of coral, but because human divers are limited in terms of the depth… read more