TAG: Contamination

Are Oats Really Gluten-Free?

oats-whole

Often,  those who wish, by preference or necessity, to avoid wheat products seek out alternative grains that are feasible as a replacement. Usually, this includes rice, corn, and oats. However, while raw whole oats themselves do not possess wheat proteins (and thus, gluten), they are bound to acquire gluten through cross-contamination during commercial food processing. In addition to patients with Celiac disease, gluten can pose problems for those with diabetes, Hashimoto’s and other forms of hyperthyroidism, and to those with a general intolerance. Oats are not the only naturally wheat-free food to acquire gluten. Rice, corn, cocoa, and even coffee… read more

Motor Oil Moving On

Motor Oil Moving On

In Swaziland, as in many countries in Africa, it is not unusual for car owners to service their own cars. However, many people still dispose of used motor oil in an environmentally irresponsible manner. In Swaziland we do not have waste facilities for hazardous products, nor do we have used-oil collectors such as in neighbouring South Africa. The result is that used oil is dumped, into landfill, or onto open ground. Oil is known to have numerous adverse effects when dumped in water or land. Some other uninformed methods of disposal of motor oil is rubbing it on timber as a repellent for… read more

Lessons from Niger Delta

Niger Delta, Africa

The Niger Delta is an oil-rich part of Nigeria. Oil prospecting and extraction operations have been undertaken by multinational companies such as Royal Dutch Shell, which was part of the controversial case The Social and Economic Rights Action Centre and another v Nigeria (“SERAC case”) which was heard by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights. In a nutshell, the SERAC case was a lawsuit where the plaintiffs argued that the government of Nigeria was directly involved in oil production through the state owned Nigerian National Petroleum Company in a joint venture with Shell Petroleum Development Corporation, and that… read more

Future For Fracking

Future For Fracking

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has been a controversial issue for some time now, mainly due to the safety and contamination problems that are inherent in the practice. However, researchers at the University of Minnesota have discovered a possible solution: chemical-degrading bacteria which can clean the used water and eliminate contamination. Centimeter-sized silicon beads will house the bacteria, and when introduced to the polluted water, the porous bead will soak up the water and the bacteria will eat away at the contaminants, effectively cleaning the water. While this is a way to make fracking safer on the whole, it cannot be… read more