TAG: Climate change

Silence Broken on Climate

Climate change

The last debate was a long shot to hear anything about climate change, but there were certain topics which would have allowed either candidate to at least bring the issue to the forefront. However, no such thing occurred, and for the first time in nearly 25 years, climate change has not been brought up in a presidential debate cycle. The third-party candidates have been discussing climate change though, but there has been little coverage of third-parties, unfortunately. Despite climate change not being directly addressed in the debates, there are clues to how either candidate would act on climate change and… read more

Green Roofs to Cool Cities

Green roofs in city

An oft-forgot aspect of rising temperatures is the additional increase in temperature in urban areas, known as the urban heat island effect. Essentially, concrete and pavement absorb heat and make the city hotter than the surrounding areas. Additionally, buildings absorb heat during the day, and release it at night. Of course, this heat absorption happens everywhere—it is simple science. However, the sheer amount of concrete and pavement covering the land and quantity of buildings in cities are what drive the temperatures up, inducing the heat island effect. Climate change is not the culprit for the increase in city temperature, though…. read more

Saving the Reef

The Great Barrier Reef

The world’s largest coral reef with an eco-system is the Great Barrier Reef located off the coast of Queensland, Australia. The eco-system is composed of over 2,900 individual reefs, 900 islands stretching for over 1,600 miles over an area of approximately 133,000 sq. mi. More than nearly half the reef has vanished in the last 27 years. A coral reef ecologist, Katharina Fabricius, from the Australian Institute of Marine Science told LiveScience that she has been diving to the reef since 1988 and has studied the decline. To gather their data, Fabricius and her colleagues surveyed 214 different reefs near the Great Barrier… read more

Can We Really Do It?

Reducing our carbon footprint

Thanks to increasing efforts worldwide, people are gradually, and in small ways, reducing their carbon footprints. It’s a large movement, based on individuals choosing to change their habits, and raise their voices against global climate change. But what happens when we are browsing the e-edition of the newspaper (to save paper), and we find out that the ice caps are still melting, will continue melting, and will be completely melted in a certain amount of time. Sometimes it can be hard to face the predictions of coming disasters. Animal extinction, factory farming, overfishing, over mining, fossil fuels. All these issues… read more

Live Sustainably. It’s Hard

Are you really living sustainably?

If you think you live sustainably, you don’t

Climate Change Migrants

The effect of rising sea level

Rising sea levels have been documented in various media of communication. For as long as the subject of climate change has made headlines, the effect of global warming on the world’s oceans has been proven by numerous scientific research and studies. The obvious problem with ocean levels rising is that ocean water encroaches on land inhabited by human beings as their place of permanent dwelling. Unfortunately, migration on the basis of the effects of climate change is a rather new phenomenon. This makes it rather difficult for international governments to recognise climate change migrants as refugees in the legal sense…. read more

Shock Tactics Required ?

Communication and climate change

Climate change activists were on a high five years ago. 2006 and 2007 might well go down in history as the golden-years of public support for action on climate change. According to various surveys at that time, environmental issues topped the list of many people’s concerns. Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth had hit screens world-wide. And equally widespread was agreement amongst scientists that climate change was real. But the climate change ‘high’ was short-lived. With the global financial crisis of 2008, popular interest in rising sea temperatures and extreme weather events promptly crashed and burned. People stopped worrying about melting ice-caps… read more

The Biosphere Project

Biosphere 2 - University of Arizona

In Santa Catalina, Arizona, the largest eco-research system on Earth rests near the mountains just north of Tucson. It’s called ‘Biosphere 2’, and its goal is to educate the public on the importance of conserving Earth’s ecosystem through smarter living and researching climate change. Built in 1986 by Space Biospheres Ventures, and now owned and maintained by the University of Arizona, Biosphere 2 is roughly the size of two and a half football fields, and is elevated 4,000ft above sea level. The glass facility has several biomes, each one unique to different Earth terrains. There’s a 1,900m rainforest, an 850m… read more

Scientists turn CO2 into $

Carbon dioxide

A group of South Korean researchers has developed a way to commercially utilize carbon dioxide that may offer a new approach to dealing with climate change. The team from Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) has successfully produced carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to bicarbonate and protons that, in turn, could produce substances widely used in industrial products, including plastic, rubber, paint and artificial bones, according to the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs. The research was part of a government-funded project to develop ways to capture and store carbon… read more