TAG: Climate change

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Turns out, tunics may have been the style of choice during 230 and 390 A.D. A tunic was unearthed in Norway, discovered in a bundle in an area used for hunting, surfacing from the Lendbreen glacier at about 6,560 feet above sea level. Actually discovered in 2011, the unique find has just now been revealed to the public. Experts used a carbon dating process to determine what time period the fabric originated from and stated that the garment is about 1,700 years old, predating the Viking era. The tunic features a boat neck opening and is made to be loose fitting. Displaying… read more

A Green Future

A Green Future

Often times, we wonder why it can be so difficult convincing people that going green is a necessary route for the future sustainability of our planet. It almost feels like pulling hair just to get friends and family to see the same way we do. Why would somebody want to keep paying their electric bill when they can install a home automation system or even solar panels to save on costs? And if people realized that purchasing an all-electric or hybrid vehicle has nearly the same cost as a traditional gas-powered car, wouldn’t they seek that alternative option? It’s one… read more

Mobilize The Young

Mobilize The Young

In an effort to mobilize the younger generation toward reducing carbon emissions and decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, the organization 350.org has launched a campaign aimed at persuading colleges and universities to divest their assets away from fossil fuel companies. The campaign is student-led, and coordinated by 350.org, a climate advocacy organization founded by author and activist Bill McKibben. Instead of utilizing fiscal or environmental arguments to persuade people and companies to move away from fossil fuel consumption, the organization’s goal is to turn global warming action into the moral issue of this generation. The campaign gathers its own data—which… read more

Astounding Water Imagery Captured On Paper

Astounding Water Imagery Captured On Paper

Artwork often captivates us because it takes us to places we cannot see or imagine ourselves. It can inspire, provoke strong emotions and can resonate throughout our thoughts, just by seeing an image that we connect with in some way. Zaria Forman is an artist that produces visually captivating pieces, and once knowing the story behind her works they become even more riveting. Her water imagery is lovingly and ardently fueled by her mother’s memory and impressive career, which also generated beautiful works revolving around remote regions and aquatic landscapes. Working with pastels, each meticulous detail is placed on paper. Her… read more

Let’s Name Extreme Storms after Climate Deniers

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With our current storm naming system, courtesy of the World Meteorological Organization, extreme weather events get named after people, somewhat capriciously. But what if someone’s name is Katrina, or Sandy, or any of the other monikers picked for extreme storms? What did they do to deserve the scorn of the world being heaped upon their name as every news outlet covers these natural disasters? A better way might be to start naming them after those politicians who continue to deny the science behind climate change, and obstruct any efforts to mitigate its effects. Just imagine if the 5 o’clock news… read more

Flash Mob Flashback

Flash Mob Flashback

The flash mob craze can be credited to an experiment put in motion by Bill Wasik in 2003. After the first few spontaneous demonstrations, people and companies became hooked, as flash mobs were an innovative way to spread the word about any relevant, or even irrelevant, idea. The majority of flash mobs were meant to be lighthearted, fun, and of course, unexpected and out of place. Smart mobs are a heightened form of public demonstration, and often try to bring light to important issues or controversial subjects. Marketing Green offers a brief review of the flash mob strategy and its technique… read more

Powerful Performances From Red Earth

Powerful Performances From Red Earth

An environmental performance art group, Red Earth, has been presenting their landscape driven series for global audiences for over 20 years. The collaborative assembly of artists who are led and co-directed by Caitlin Easterby and Simon Pascoe recreate intense installation experiences that are much different than any art gallery or history lecture could possibly encompass. Their action driven works have focused on issues like climate change, agricultural and ecological concerns as well as other significant historic passages. In addition to a heightened environmental element, their exhibitions also seek to uphold the relevance of cultural connections. Performances have largely centered around… read more

Bristol Seeks Input on Low Carbon Future

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The city of Bristol, UK, is seeking input and engagement on the question of what it means to become a “low carbon city” through a new interactive website that presents users with two different future scenarios. After a four-year research project by Dr Rose Bailey at University of the West of England, which explored how Bristol could meet a carbon reduction target of 80% by 2050, two different schemes, Scenario X and Scenario Y, were introduced in February 2013. According to Future Bristol, This project seeks to engage the public in what it means for Bristol to be a “low… read more

Free Online Portal Provides Global GHG Data

Free Online Portal Provides Global GHG Data

Making sense of the huge amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions data from around the world can be a daunting task, but a new online portal aims to make that information more accessible and easy to use. The Climate Analysis Indicators Tool, or CAIT 2.0, from the World Resources Institute (WRI) has data on the GHG emissions from all 50 US states, as well as 186 other countries, and lets users sort, view, download, or visualize the data sets for further analysis or comparison. “Through its powerful yet simple and easy-to-use online interface, CAIT 2.0 is designed to help users… read more

A Dry Mississippi?

Mighty Mississippi

It is common knowledge now the United States is experiencing the worst drought in half a century, causing the agricultural and transportation industries major headaches, aside from the negative impacts on the environment. Due to the drought, the water levels in the Mississippi River are close to historic lows, which could shut down all shipping in a matter of weeks. In a strange turn of events, the river has performed a complete 180° shift in the past 18 months—flooding in the spring of 2011 forced thousands to flee their homes, and now the river is dry. Without rain, the drought… read more