TAG: Bees

The Impact on Humans if Bees Become Extinct

Endangered Bees

Many bee species have been dying out in recent years, with honeybees suffering the most dramatic decline. The loss of bees has been attributed to pesticides and other toxic chemicals, mite infestations, infections, and possibly even cell phone radiation. Monoculture (growing single crops) is also a problem because bees are less healthy when they consume only one type of food. Bees are critical to the sustainability of our food supply. Loss of the pollination services that bees provide would wipe out around 80% of our food plants. If we lost the bees completely, we’d lose the majority of our fruits,… read more

EPA Receives Protests Over Plant Labeling – and Listens

garden_center

If you’ve been keeping up with current news concerning the staggering rate of bee die-offs (or viewed Blackle’s recent post on the matter), you’ll be well aware the detrimental impact of insecticides on the global bee population. In addition to the decline of bee populations, this month’s coverage of insecticide-treated “bee friendly” plants from Home Depot and other garden centers has invoked powerful responses from environmentalists and concerned consumers alike. The insecticides used on these plants were neonicotinoids, a class of pesticides proven as harmful to pollinators and the food supply. After months of neglecting to respond to public concern,… read more

“Bee Safe” Plants Found to Contain Harmful Insecticides

bee_flower

Despite the efforts of home gardeners to grow plants in a manner that is safe for bee,  many gardeners are actually filling their yards with deadly insecticides. Bee die-off rates have reached staggering proportions within recent years. Last winter, beekeepers reported a loss of 40-90% of their bees. There are a few known causes contributing to this death toll, from commercial insecticide use to Colony Collapse disorder, a phenomenon discovered in France in the 1990’s, in which the adult bees mysteriously abandon the hive, leaving even their queens behind. Now it seems some of the problem is coming from the… read more

Bee Hunting Threats

Bee Hunters

Bee hunting and honey harvesting are social activities that most young men will experience growing up in rural Swaziland. Honey bees are not only a food source, but they also provide an opportunity for young men to show how brave they are by partaking in the social activity of bee hunting. Hunting for bees has been customary to Swazis for a long time, it is a skill that is passed from one generation to the next. The manner in which honey is harvested has evolved over time, the older generation used a certain type of wood to immobilise bees in… read more

Bee Population Reaches A Record Loss

Wild_bee

Over the duration of the 20th century, 50 percent of wild bee species were lost in the U.S. Just this last winter, honey-beekeepers reported an average bee die-off of 50 percent, which is the highest the die-off rate has been in the last forty years. Of all the foods we eat, at least 75 percent rely on the pollination of bees, including blueberries, almonds, and coffee (which is already under ecological strain). This furthermore threatens the existence of  animal species whose diets are comprised solely on berries, nuts, and other pollination dependent fruit and seeds. According to the USDA ,… read more

Urban Bee Keeping

Urban bee keeping

The Opera House in Paris has kept bees for quite some time. The Boston Sea Port Hotel houses hundreds of thousands of bees on its rooftop which help pollinate hundreds of local gardens. Urban bee keeping is a necessity and can help with lower cost of a healthier diet with rooftop gardens. The issue with urban bee keeping is the fear that bees can be a nuisance. Bees actually help to pollinate and in turn create honey. This helps the environment especially in urban cities where metal rooftops grace the open skies. Rather than ugly rooftops we can replace them… read more