Facebook

Subscribe to the Blackle Newsletter

Eco Search

Blackle

Living Paper

Seed Paper

Image source: www.backspace.com

Imagine a greeting card that comes to life, literally sprouting up from the ground in a bouquet of wildflowers. With seed paper, this is possible.

What is seed paper?

It is a treeless paper made from recycled fibers that are embedded with non-invasive wildflower seeds. Sometimes herb and vegetable seeds are used instead. It can be made by hand or manufactured, with several companies and retailers offering seed embedded paper, in addition to other treeless alternatives.

Once the paper has fulfilled its assignment as a flyer, wedding invite, or note pad for jotting, it can be planted directly into the ground and with daily watering the seeds will germinate and grow. So, if you should find yourself the recipient of a seed speckled birthday card, you needn’t worry about storing it.

When the time comes to plant seed paper, it is important to pick a spot that gets a good amount of sun exposure and shower it generously with water. Aside from writing sheets, seed paper has also been used to create envelopes, bookmarks,business cards, and wedding favor containers, among other things. All of these items can be planted as well. And you aren’t limited to writing long hand on seed paper as it can be printed on without damage to the seeds. You may do so using normal ink, although most companies that make writing or image adorned seed paper use soy ink for their designs, which isn’t a bad thing to look into either.

Although tree-free papers have been around for centuries, the idea is still fresh. So fresh that it’s perishable. Because it is made with natural materials and is chemical free, seed paper will eventually expire. Most seed paper, like seeds, have a three year shelf life. This gives you plenty of time to use the paper, so long as you don’t get too large a quantity. Although, if you are a slow reader, you may not want to forget that bookmark in your latest paperback.

If you read this far, we assume you found this post interesting. Please help Blackle Mag thrive by sharing it using the social media buttons below.

What did you think of this post? Let us know in the comments below.

Visit out sister site blackle.com
© 2017 Heap Media | Privacy Policy & Terms