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Planting in Accordance with the Moon

Planting in correlation with the moon’s phases is a practice that traces back to the beginning of agriculture, and remains an important part of bio-dynamic agriculture.

The process of ascending and descending of the moon lasts approximately 27 days, 7 hours, and 43 minutes.

During the waxing phase, the amount of sap in plants increases. This is a sign of activity increase in aerial plants.

Fruits with higher juice contents are best harvested at this time. It is also best to cut the lawn while the moon is waxing, as it promotes better growth.

As the moon begins to wane, the flow of fluids decrease in plants. Thus, growth occurs primarily in the roots. To utilize the winding down of the moon, harvest plant that you wish to dry quickly, such as herbs or root crops. Other activities, including pruning, re-planting, and spreading compost and fertilizer, should be performed during the latter half of the lunar phase.

In addition to the dilation of the moon in the sky, and the corresponding implosion of its reflection, the constellation in which the moon currently resides can also have a strong influence on plants.

When the moon is set in a fire constellation, for example, plant activity is concentrated primarily in the in the development of fruits and seeds. You should take this time to plant tomatoes, beans, peas, and apples.

As the moon passes into an air constellation, it is the flowering part of plants that grow best. Plants that should be cultivated during this phase include cauliflower, artichokes, and ornamental flowers.

Leaves grow best while the moon rests in a water constellation. Meaning, it is an optimal time to work on salad vegetables, spinach, and kale. Bark and roots begin to develop as the moon approaches an earth constellation. Your focus during this time should be n carrots, potatoes, celery, and asparagus.

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