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5th Highest Global Temps

The globally-averaged temperature for November 2012 marked the fifth warmest November since record keeping began in 1880. November 2012 also marks the 36th consecutive November and 333rd consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average.

Most areas of the world experienced higher-than-average monthly temperatures, including far eastern Russia, Australia, the central and western United States, northern Africa, and most of Europe and western Asia. Meanwhile, central Asia, Alaska, much of western and central Canada, and the eastern United States were most notably cooler than average.

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for November was the fifth highest on record for November, at 56.41°F (13.67°C) or 1.21°F (0.67°C) above the 20th century average. The margin of error associated with this temperature is ±0.13°F (0.07°C).

November marked the 36th consecutive November and 333rd consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average. The last below-average temperature November was November 1976 and the last below-average temperature month was February 1985.

The global land temperature was the sixth warmest November on record, at 2.03°F (1.13°C) above the 20th century average. The margin of error is ±0.20°F (0.11°C).

The average November daytime (maximum) temperature across Australia was 3.11°F (1.73°C) above normal, making it the country’s fourth warmest November since national records began in 1950. No state or territory had maximum or minimum temperatures below the long-term average.

Temperatures ranged from 4.3 to 7.9°F (2.4 to 4.4°C) above average across Croatia during November. Northwestern and eastern Croatia were “very warm” while most of central and southern Croatia were “extremely warm”, as categorized by the country’s national meteorological service.

Neutral conditions continued during November across the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, with sea surface temperatures slightly above average. According to NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, neutral conditions will likely continue through the Northern Hemisphere winter 2012/13 into spring 2013.

Which means most of us might not see snow this year. What a bummer!

Source:
NOAA
Image: NOAA

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