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Food Straight From The Trash

Growing fruits and vegetables from seeds is one way to grow your own, but another way to cultivate your own plants can be done with the parts of food that is normally thrown away.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

This process is simple and can definitely extend a grocery budget, as applying this economical way of gardening utilizes all of the plant.

DIY-n-Crafts has a resource guide and instructions on how to grow 25 different foods from scraps. Consider the climate and indoor temperature when choosing which items to grow.

diyncrafts.com

Image source: diyncrafts.com

Ideas for produce that grows well this way are fruits and vegetables like pineapples, avocados, carrots, potatoes, lettuces, onion and bok choy. Some varieties of nuts and herbs can also be started like this.

Tropical varieties, like pineapples, prefer a lot of sun and may be a bit more challenging, but it can be done successfully indoors with optimal growing conditions and proper drainage after rooting.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

Other plants like green onions and lemongrass simply need to be started in a glass of water.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

Free People offers a good accompanying visual how-to of the process.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

All that is needed, aside from the food scraps saved from the fate of the garbage or compost pile, is a glass container, toothpicks or wooden skewers, a bit of soil and a sunny spot in the window.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

First, prep the scraps to remove any of the fleshy parts or stems that will likely fall off or will mold and ruin the attempt. Then, most items will need to be placed in a water soak to start the root growth.

The toothpicks help hold up the part of the plant that is used, keeping it from becoming waterlogged and rotting.

Food Straight From The Trash

Image source: blog.freepeople.com

Change out the water as necessary when it looks cloudy or smelly. When roots start to form, the plants can be transferred to a soil filled container and put in a sunny location so they can take off.

Starting a garden from food scraps is a fun way to involve the whole family in the plant growing process while enlisting a waste-free attitude.

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