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Waterless Cooking

Cooking without water could be the next household tradition.

Waterless cookware is more than a concoction of efficient materials; it’s a method that allows food to baste in its own moisture, making additional water unnecessary. This method has actually been around for over a hundred years, but the introduction of stainless steel and other materials has enabled for its continued innovation.

Like most innovations, there is an investment to be made in waterless cookware. But just as cast iron skillets and Kitchen Aid mixers can remain in families for decades, being past down as culinary heirlooms, waterless cookware may be used for generations as well. Only the energy saved using them will keep them relevant.

How it’s made
To make waterless cookware, seven layers of metal, including three layers of surgical stainless steel, are merged together. This creates durable cookware that evenly distributes heat and reduces cooking time.  In addition to these layers, there is a water seal cover that eliminates the need for oils or cooking spray.

Energy Savings
One benefit of using waterless cookware is that you can cook food thoroughly using only low to medium temperatures. This eliminates the need to accelerate energy use through higher temperatures. One company, dubbed Lustre Craft, has a stack cooking method, which allows multiple items to be cooked atop the other within the same pot. Because all items are using the same heat source, energy and space is being saved.

Improved Nutrition
Most fruits and vegetables can be cooked in waterless pots without being peeled. This alone adds more nutrition to your meal and saves you time on preparation. Cooking in waterless pans also increases the natural medicines found in food by retaining the maximum amounts of vitamins and minerals. Plus, no oil or non-stick spray is needed, so your meals won’t be coated in added fat or dangerous chemicals.

Resource
http://www.lustrecraftcookware.com/

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