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Adorable Tiny Origami

Origami is the traditional Japanese art of paper folding. It is said to have started in the 17th century AD and was popularized outside of Japan in the mid-1900s.

Its name comes from the word ori meaning “folding”, and kami meaning “paper“, and it is now a modern form of art.

Origami is made by transforming a flat sheet of paper into a sculptural design, through folding and sculpting techniques that requires no cuts or glue. The best thing about it is that anyone can do it, instructions are easily found and the only thing needed is a square sheet of paper, and dedication.

Adorable Tiny Origami

Image source: www.shop.faltsucht.de

A master in the subject, working within a small scale, is German artist Anja Markiewicz who folds paper into tiny shapes small enough to fit on the tip of a finger.

Markiewicz’s impossibly small origami pieces use only one sheet of paper and are smaller than an inch in width. Armed with a toothpick, her skilled hands and a load of patience, this skillful paper artist gives shape to the most amazing little art pieces.

Adorable Tiny Origami

Image source: www.shop.faltsucht.de

Her “nano-origami” figures take the shape of miniature animals, snowflakes, flowers and a variety of other itsy-bitsy forms, which are very low-impact, surprising and adorable. Cranes, dragons, mice, snowflakes, flowers and all sorts of insects have been recreated in paper in an extraordinary scale.

She works from her studio in Potsdam, near Berlin, folding her tiny paper sculptures with an amazing precision and elegance, paying homage to the traditional Japanese craft.

Adorable Tiny Origami

Image source: www.shop.faltsucht.de

Origami is an extremely eco-friendly hobby, as paper is biodegradable, compostable, recycled and recyclable.

For people interested in owning one of Markiewicz’ wonderful creations, she is selling her nano-origami art encased in adorable jewelry, charms and key rings that can be easily carried around and, of course, weigh next to nothing.

Adorable Tiny Origami

Image source: www.shop.faltsucht.de

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