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What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Turns out, tunics may have been the style of choice during 230 and 390 A.D.

A tunic was unearthed in Norway, discovered in a bundle in an area used for hunting, surfacing from the Lendbreen glacier at about 6,560 feet above sea level.

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Image source: by Vivian Wangen from news.discovery.com

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Image source: by Vivian Wangen from news.discovery.com

Actually discovered in 2011, the unique find has just now been revealed to the public. Experts used a carbon dating process to determine what time period the fabric originated from and stated that the garment is about 1,700 years old, predating the Viking era.

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Image source: nbcnews.com/science

The tunic features a boat neck opening and is made to be loose fitting. Displaying some damage, the simply made piece also appears to have been repaired several times to extend its wear. Thought to be made from lamb’s wool, it is weaved into a diamond twill pattern, shown below next to a close up of the shirt.

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Image source: by Marianne Vedeler, pattern drawing from Lise Bender Jørgensen, from news.discovery.com

What Did People Wear Ages Ago?

Image source: by Marianne Vedeler, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, from news.discovery.com

Global warming is suspect of attributing to the glacial meltdown that had been in a thawing stage, thus exposing the garment over a period of time.

Some additional clothing finds include a mitten from the year 800 and a shoe made of leather from the Bronze Age. Other discoveries consist of hunting artifacts, and around 1,600 other items have been found in the southern mountain regions of Norway alone. Experts state that the expanse has been under a faster than usual melting state since 2006.

Only a few other shirts comparable to this style have lasted this long of a time span in Europe, since fabrics this old can actually crumble within weeks when exposed to the outdoor elements and insects.

Scientists note that climate change is providing some exciting times for archaeologists and discoverers, and say that more finds like this one are to be expected. It is interesting to catch a glimpse into other times from long ago, and also a little thought provoking as to how we are able to do so.

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