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Low-energy Glowing Home

Using transparent or translucent materials in architecture is a clever way to get natural light and warmth inside a building, brightening up spaces and helping reducing energy bills.

Low-energy Glowing Home

Image source: www.al1-architektinnen.de

Taking this concept on board, studio AL1 created a brilliant translucent family home located right in the middle of the woodsy area of Weissenbach, in Vienna.

This simple sparkling house is wrapped in a polycarbonate skin and when the sun shines on it, it glows in a whimsical manner.

Low-energy Glowing Home

Image source: www.al1-architektinnen.de

Called Gemini House, it was built using local and natural materials, while taking advantage of industrial building solutions and dedicated craftsmanship from professionals in the area.

The building consists of two L-shaped volumes that engage in dialogue with one another forming external patios and outdoors spaces around them, which are full of luscious vegetation.

Combining traditional techniques with industrial and technological solutions, this brilliant shelter in Lower Austria uses a wood-concrete composite (as well as the see-through polycarbonate) for creating both, ceilings and walls.

It also incorporates wood from the surrounding forests, clay from the excavation for the heated floor and fast-growing hemp, coming from nearby Czech Republic, that acts as a natural insulator protecting the family home during cold snowy winters.

Low-energy Glowing Home

Image source: www.al1-architektinnen.de

It was designed to be open plan, so kids and adults can wander around freely inside the house. This openness also allows natural light to fill every corner of the house, without much need of electrical lighting.

Bright and cool, the house´s many windows let the breeze flow around the space bringing in fresh air from the surrounded woodland.

Low-energy Glowing Home

Image source: www.al1-architektinnen.de

Energy-efficient, as well as avoiding the need for electrical light, Gemini House boasts a luscious green roof that acts as earthy insulation, provides a tiny environment for local wildlife and helps the architectural project merge with its green surrondings.

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