Cleaning Up The Town With Reverse Graffiti Art

Cleaning Up The Town With Reverse Graffiti Art

Reverse graffiti, sometimes called green graffiti, is an interesting spin on public artwork displays. Street graffiti is known for making a lasting impression, until it is covered up or painted over. Reverse graffiti makes profound statements also, but the only way to rid a space of the marks of a green graffiti artist is to make it cleaner. Without the use of sprays, harsh chemicals or pollutants, reverse graffiti artists work with dirty surfaces as a medium and use tools like fingers, brushes, rags, stencils and even power washers to make impressions on the less than clean street canvases. Targets… read more

Recycling Reminders

Recycling Reminders

When it comes to some items, like disposable containers, their toss away exterior may have an effect on whether or not they make it to the recycling bin. One study published in the Journal of Consumer Research looked at what prompted consumers to throw away items or recycle them. It was found that the perception of usefulness may be correlated to whether or not an object is recycled. The more worth something holds to the user, the more likely it is to be recycled. In relation to everyday convenience products, this could offer some perspective into recycling behaviors and the… read more

Mobilize The Young

Mobilize The Young

In an effort to mobilize the younger generation toward reducing carbon emissions and decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, the organization 350.org has launched a campaign aimed at persuading colleges and universities to divest their assets away from fossil fuel companies. The campaign is student-led, and coordinated by 350.org, a climate advocacy organization founded by author and activist Bill McKibben. Instead of utilizing fiscal or environmental arguments to persuade people and companies to move away from fossil fuel consumption, the organization’s goal is to turn global warming action into the moral issue of this generation. The campaign gathers its own data—which… read more

Campaign For Ugly Animals

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We all know that when it comes to unspoken life rules, anything cute and cuddly takes priority above everything else. This is why cute animals rarely make it to the endangered species list, and when they do, the world rallies to save them. After all, we couldn’t live without cute lil’ Sea Lions swimming around, right? (ok, I take that back, those things are absolutely adorable). Here’s a quick video describing the UAPS and their mission: It’s because of backwards human psychology that ‘The Ugly Animal Preservation Society’ exists in the first place. Congratulations, world; you’re responsible for the extinction… read more

Common Crane Recolonizing in Scotland

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After centuries of absence, common cranes are beginning to recolonize in Scotland. The return was not an organized attempt by conservationists, but the natural migration and breeding of at least one mating pair. Beyond Scotland, small pools of cranes are turning up in northern and western Europe. Cranes are of an unmistakable symbolism, playing a role in the myths of regions as varied as France and east Asia. Flamboyant and temperamental, these lithe and leggy creatures are gifted with long, slender physiques, which they use to participate in lively mating rituals. This is perhaps the reason that a majority of… read more

Uncovering Under-Water “Mystery Circles”

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In the perilous waters of Amami Oshima, Southern Japan, sea beds lay inscribed with ornate circles of a once mysterious origin. Within these circles intricate sweeps and grooves create shapely mounds of sand that come together and part to constellate geometric works of art that mirror the symbolic art of ancient Celts just as much as they emulate crop circles. The “mystery circles” were first discovered 20 years ago, some 80 ft below the water’s surface. Images of the circles were captured by Yoji Ookata, a deep sea photographer, while diving in the southern tip of Japan’s coast. Having obtained his… read more

An Incredibly Insightful YouTube Video

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If you have 3-minutes to spare out of your busy day, we encourage you to check this video out. Edited by David Bayliss, the clips are taken from various documentaries about the earth. We’ve created a list of important eco films you should see when you get the chance, so consider this a sneak peak at the beauty you’ll discover by watching them.

5 Eco Films You Need To Watch Right Now

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You probably think you know quite a bit about our planet, but the truth is, you really don’t. These five films will blow your mind (which is such a cliche phrase, but totally applies in this case). Check it: Earth This BBC documentary is a long one to be sure, but definitely worth the time to sit down and take an adventure around our planet. Narrated by an epic cast including Patrick Stewart, James Earl Jones, and Ken Watanabe, ‘Earth’ is one documentary to remember. March of The Penguins Follow the annual journey of Emperor Penguins to their breeding grounds…. read more

Astounding Water Imagery Captured On Paper

Astounding Water Imagery Captured On Paper

Artwork often captivates us because it takes us to places we cannot see or imagine ourselves. It can inspire, provoke strong emotions and can resonate throughout our thoughts, just by seeing an image that we connect with in some way. Zaria Forman is an artist that produces visually captivating pieces, and once knowing the story behind her works they become even more riveting. Her water imagery is lovingly and ardently fueled by her mother’s memory and impressive career, which also generated beautiful works revolving around remote regions and aquatic landscapes. Working with pastels, each meticulous detail is placed on paper. Her… read more

Teaching Children About Biomimicry

Teaching Children About Biomimicry

Children love to learn more about the world around them. Feed their curious minds with age appropriate, free activities and lesson plans that revolve around biomimicry so they can further relate their outer surroundings to areas in their own lives. Teach Engineering has a hands-on activity for kids with a suggested age of around 3 through 5, though it can be altered to suit other ages. Provided from the College of Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder, the focus is on natural design and how engineers apply it to making products. Learners are asked to think about solutions… read more