The Edgeland House Splits From Standard Designs

The Edgeland House Splits From Standard Designs

The Edgeland House, wedged into its grassy spot in the earth, is interesting to look at. This unique, underground split home was designed and constructed by Bercy Chen Studio LP. Built with a pit house design, which is an ancient home construction technique attributed to North American natives, it is sunken into the ground to utilize natural thermal heating. This keeps the temperature of the home comfortable all year. The split layout provides one section for the living area and the other for bedroom space. The open outdoor plot in between the separate units is a 7 foot dug out area… read more

Incredible Tree Houses

fantasy-treehouse

Arboreal abodes are, in themselves, quite fantastical. Appearing nearly as extensions of the very branches they rest upon, their presence alone conjures questions about the whimsical beings that live within. Though unquestionably part of a niche market, these houses can provide a new outlook on life. Even if you never choose to live within a sylvan hollow, a single day spent in arboreal accommodations can help to recenter your creative focus. Often, tree houses are constructed of materials that are both renewable and locally sourced. Furthermore, some may still be able to biodegrade, electrical installations aside, assuming they haven’t been… read more

Save Our Thirsty World

Water conservation

With some places in the world facing scarce water supplies and some others trickling into the beginning stages of water shortage alerts, water conservation awareness is a must. Though many of us take having a daily water supply for granted, water scarcity around the world is a fundamental issue. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a typical U.S. household containing 4 members uses around 400 gallons of water per day just at home, with most of this being from indoor water use. This is more than twice the daily worldwide average, comprising a large amount of daily water use as… read more

The Canopy Tower Apartments Envelope Tenants in Nature

canopy-tower

The Canopy is a concept apartment tower conceived by Boutique Designs, a Hong Kong based design agency, as a means of merging urban efficiency with nature. The project will achieve this through the tower’s optimized structure, designed to lower construction costs and simplify reproduction. The structure’s energy-efficient properties are acquired through implementation of a glass facade, which grants tenants 360-degree exposure to sunlight, and an AC compressor; in addition to the abundance of plant-life perching throughout both the building’s interior and exterior. Gracing the tower with more than sylvan beauty, the trees lend their talent for capturing pollutant particles in… read more

Falling Leaves – On A House?

Falling Leaves – On A House?

Just in time for autumn and its theatrics of splendid, color concentrated falling leaves, a remodel of an outdoor space has an added element of surprise. Located in Mayfair, London, this residential space has received a unique exterior makeover. Covered in 1000’s of  replicas of glimmering leaves, this renovation is an exquisite example of creative design. The front of the home faces the street and sits amidst other structures that are also part of the house. The home and its locality are interesting also. Portions of the existing house are from the 18th century and are in an historic district… read more

Architectual Oddities Fill-in City Gaps

live-between

Eradicating urban cavities across the likes of New York City and Helsinki, Live Between Buildings are slender apartments, set to be installed within the nooks and crannies of cramped city-scapes. Their 5-foot width and tactful design allow the apartments to rest snuggly within areas that are otherwise difficult to utilize. They also allow occupants to live in-between homes without any indications towards a transient lifestyle. Their proposal came about as part of the International Design Competition, NEW VISION OF THE LOFT 2, organized by FAKRO in collaboration with the magazine A10 European Architecture – having won the contest. The winning project… read more

Branches, Branches Everywhere

Branches, Branches Everywhere

Need to hang, store or display something? Grab a branch. There are many ways to put them to work around the home. Don’t pay a fortune and create your own natural design with fallen outdoor finds and leftover wood pieces. Custom wood items can be expensive. Sturdy, long branches can be cut, sanded, stained or painted and affixed to walls and used as handrails. Clothes racks and closet systems can be costly, however assembling your own with outdoor objects, scrap wood and some hardware allows a budget friendly way to organize clothing and other items. Portions of logs or branches make… read more

Reclaimed Wood Revival

Reclaimed Wood Revival

Being on a budget doesn’t have to mean giving up quality. Wood furniture and construction materials can be expensive, and turning to reclaimed woods can provide a sturdy, quality design for a lot less. Repurposing and turning salvaged wood into high end pieces cuts waste and assures an original design. Check out the following reclaimed projects for some DIY enticement. Old barn doors are great finds and can be used for many different interior applications. Creating a sliding door with them can open up more space in a room. Clearance for the opening isn’t needed because it just slides back and… read more

This Hill House Is A Social Magnet

This Hill House Is A Social Magnet

Architects Andrew Maynard and Mark Austin, who work with lifestyle designs, had an imaginative idea to accommodate a family’s wish for an addition to their existing home. Located near Melbourne, Australia, the Hill House takes a vertical approach and completely revolutionizes the look of the exterior with a slope built directly into the landscaping. The spot faces north, which before the addition caused the backyard and parts of the indoors to be darker. When a 2-story extension was added, it further restricted the natural solar availability and made portions of the yard and home even more shadowed. For the new addition,… read more

Slow Home: 12 Steps To A More Relaxed Living Space

Slow Home: 12 Steps To A More Relaxed Living Space

The slow home movement, initiated in 2006 by John Brown, Matthew North and Carina van Olm, produced an innovation in the way people see their home space. The chart and quiz below offer their fundamental views of what is considered a slow home. The designers felt the need to focus on a slow approach to homes due to the way they were being manufactured, which according to the team can be comparable to fast food eateries, popping up everywhere but sometimes offering products of questionable value. In order to figure out areas of significance that could lend to an optimal… read more