Thobisa Simelane

Let’s Work Together To Make A Change

Science Law and the Environment

The law and science are two separate fields, mutually independent of the other, however often there are instances when the two fields must work together for a common greater good. Preservation and promotion of the environment is one such instance when scientific and legal efforts should work in concert to achieve a positive outcome. Science explains why and how certain environmental phenomena occur, it lends insight into the scientific processes that have led to the current climate and environmental crises that we face today. More than that, science is instrumental in offering a pool of potential solutions to the problems… read more

Could Renewable Energy Be Cheaper?

Cheaper Renewable Energy

Traditional electricity generation has played an important role in creating the civilization that we call our world today. Electricity continues to be so important for general day to day activity and business such that we cannot imagine living in a world without electricity. It has been proven by numerous studies, however, that the way in which we have been generating power is not sustainable and thus burdensome on the environment and the world’s climate. Fortunately there are sources of renewable energy available to mankind for the generation of power, these include wind, water, biomass, geothermal and solar. Even though these… read more

Motor Oil Moving On

Motor Oil Moving On

In Swaziland, as in many countries in Africa, it is not unusual for car owners to service their own cars. However, many people still dispose of used motor oil in an environmentally irresponsible manner. In Swaziland we do not have waste facilities for hazardous products, nor do we have used-oil collectors such as in neighbouring South Africa. The result is that used oil is dumped, into landfill, or onto open ground. Oil is known to have numerous adverse effects when dumped in water or land. Some other uninformed methods of disposal of motor oil is rubbing it on timber as a repellent for… read more

Golf – Not Green At All!

www.onthehouse.com.au

Golf was once thought to be a sport for snobs, but not anymore! It is a popular recreational and professional sport in many parts of the world, even in developing countries. What price do we pay for golf courses though? Golf courses are known for their aesthetic appeal, the span of land that remains green year round is breathtaking and simply wonderful to the eye. Golf courses however have a negative effect on the environment from when they are constructed. Before a course can be set up, a lot of clearing is required, thereby destroying habitats and causing erosion. A… read more

Religion vs Environment

Religion V Environment

The right to religious freedom, thought and belief is a fundamental right recognised by the United Nations through Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The United Nations also recognises the need for humans to preserve our natural environment, and refrain from activity that unnecessarily depletes natural resources. It becomes problematic when the two compete for precedence. In Swaziland we have many Christian denominations which hold just as many different beliefs. There are denominations that hold the belief that a valid baptism is one performed in a natural river, as opposed to water in a pool. There are… read more

Who Should We Blame?

Illegal Mining

Natural minerals can be of great benefit to a country if extracted responsibly. It is unfortunate that in the developing world, more especially the African region, precious metals have been the source of grave ruin in the form of warfare and injustice. Natural resources are also increasingly causing environmental concerns in unregulated or under monitored territories, where illegal mining has become the order of the day. Illegal mining generally involves the extraction of natural minerals without a valid permit to do so, or contravening conditions set forth in a valid permit. The scourge of illegal mining will usually occur where… read more

Giving Green A Helping Hand

Giving Green a Helping Hand

One of the main consequences of climate change is that the world is being literally forced into finding alternatives to the way things have been done traditionally. Our consumption habits have particularly been challenged, because unlike in the past, our choices must be informed by our impact on the environment rather than the price at which goods or services are offered. This being the case, it will not be easy selling the “green living” philosophy to everyone. What informs spending habits differs from person to person, thus if the government is going to encourage green living there must be benefits… read more

A Delicate Balance

A Delicate Balance

Environmental awareness and protectionist measures are at an all time high. Many countries in the developing world have set up a framework for sound regulation of the use and reliance on the environment. However, bad economic times pose challenges that have caused tension between human and environment survival. In these hard and trying times, many unscrupulous corporations are taking advantage of the challenges faced by developing countries. The dire need for job creation and foreign investment has opened the unfortunate opportunity for governments to be open to negotiations on investments that were otherwise not open for negotiation. In Swaziland, the… read more

Bee Hunting Threats

Bee Hunters

Bee hunting and honey harvesting are social activities that most young men will experience growing up in rural Swaziland. Honey bees are not only a food source, but they also provide an opportunity for young men to show how brave they are by partaking in the social activity of bee hunting. Hunting for bees has been customary to Swazis for a long time, it is a skill that is passed from one generation to the next. The manner in which honey is harvested has evolved over time, the older generation used a certain type of wood to immobilise bees in… read more

Traditional Laws – Are They Still Relevant?

Traditional Laws

Legal pluralism is not uncommon in many countries which were once colonies of western powers. In an era where colonisation was the norm, colonial masters introduced new cultures, lifestyle, and laws to the lands in which they sought to have influence. Swaziland is no different from the many African countries with legal pluralism. There are so- called “western courts” where common law and statutory law is administered by state appointed judicial officers. Then there are traditional structures where Swazi customary law is administered by chiefs appointed by a complex Royal order which is beyond the scope of this article to… read more