Jennifer Copley

Why Buy Organic?

Organically grown

Is organic food worth the extra cost? It’s certainly better for the environment because organic growers don’t use toxic pesticides or genetically modified organisms, and organic growing requires less fossil fuel. However, shipping organic foods requires fossil fuel and generates carbon emissions, so buying locally is better. Organic produce is also far less likely to be contaminated with toxic pesticide residues, which have been linked to cancer, birth defects, and neurological issues, and it may be more nutritious as well. Some studies comparing nutritional content have found in favor of organic produce whereas others have noted no significant differences, likely… read more

Top 12 Must-Read Foodie Books

Food Books

Here are 12 must-read books for those who are interested in food, health, and sustainability: 1. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan – A fascinating investigation into the ways in which industrial, organic, and alternative foods are produced and distributed, and their social, moral, political, and economic implications. 2. Compassion by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare by F. Bailey Norwood and Jason L. Lusk – An exploration of ethical issues, the feasibility of various animal welfare measures, and what could be done to promote the health and happiness of farm animals…. read more

Invite Rosemary to Dinner

rosemary-jungle

Rosemary is a wonderfully pungent herb that offers a broad array of health benefits. It stimulates the immune system, improves digestion and circulation, and has anti-inflammatory properties (inflammation is implicated in many health problems ranging from asthma to arthritis). Evidence suggests that the scent of rosemary even boosts brain performance. Rosemary can be purchased fresh and stored in the fridge (you can extend its life by wrapping it in a slightly damp paper towel). You can also freeze rosemary by chopping the leaves into ice cube trays, covering them with water, and keeping them in the freezer. These rosemary cubes… read more

Oats: A Buyers’ Guide

Oats: A Buyers' Guide

Eating oats regularly helps to protect against a wide variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, as well as aiding weight control. There are a number of different oat products available for those who want to incorporate this nutritious whole grain into their diets. Oat groats: Oat groats are hulled oat kernels that can be used in stuffings or cereals. They have a more rounded shape because they have not been sliced or rolled like most oat products. Steel-cut oats/Scotch oats/Irish oats: These oat groats are sliced but not rolled like quicker-cooking oat products, so they’re thicker and… read more

Window Farming

Window farms

Window farming is a new movement among urbanites who want to grow their own food but lack outdoor space. Many people living in city centers would love to grow fresh produce but don’t have access to a garden or even a paved outside space where they could place containers. Window farms, which are space-efficient indoor hydroponic growing systems, enable city dwellers to turn their sunny windows into productive food gardens. Window farm plants grow in vertical columns of containers that hang from a pole at the top of a window. There are stylish window farm kits available for sale, though… read more

Winter Seasonal Eating

Winter Seasonal Eating

Seasonal eating has become increasingly popular for a number of reasons. Fresh produce that has not been shipped from far away tends to be tastier, more nutritious, and significantly better for the environment. However, when contemplating the switch to a more seasonal diet, many people are concerned that they will have no fruits and vegetables to eat during the winter months. Fortunately, there are plenty of colorful, fresh produce options throughout the cold season. Root vegetables: Root vegetables such as carrots, beets, potatoes, and yams grow well in cold weather and store nicely. Roasted root vegetables drizzled with olive oil… read more

How Green Are They Really?

Greenwashing

Greenwashing is a means by which companies make their products or services seem more eco-friendly and sustainable than they actually are. TerraChoice (2010) has identified seven common types of greenwashing: Hidden trade-off: Focusing on one eco-friendly aspect of a product while neglecting all the other negative impacts associated with its production Lack of proof: Making claims of environmental friendliness that are impossible to substantiate (for example, percentage of recycled content in a tissue paper product) Vagueness: Using misleading claims such as “all-natural,” which don’t necessarily mean that products are eco-friendly or even healthy (arsenic is all-natural) Irrelevance: Making true assertions… read more

The Milk Debate

Cow vs Goat

Goat’s milk has a number of advantages over cow’s milk. Research conducted at the University of Granada (2007) found that goat’s milk helps the body better use minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus, which means that it is superior to cow’s milk for maintaining strong bones and preventing anaemia. Goat’s milk is also more digestable than cow’s milk because it has a different type of fat, and is less likely to provoke allergic reactions because it contains less lactose and far less of the allergenic casein protein. Many (though not all) of those who can’t tolerate cow’s milk… read more

Best Eat Your Oats

Eat Your Oats

  Oats are among the health-promoting superfoods. Study findings reported by the Whole Grains Council and the George Mateljan Foundation suggest that oats reduce the risk of many different illnesses, as well as helping to maintain a healthy weight. Weight control: A study of 204 overweight adults found that eating whole-grain oat-based cereal twice a day helped subjects to reduce their waistlines. A control group eating the same number of calories did not achieve the same waist-circumference reduction. Other research has found that whole grains create a greater feeling of satiety than white bread (which reduces the likelihood of food… read more

Soy What?

Soy And Human Health

Some studies indicate that soy is a superfood while others have linked it to health problems. Why has research yielded such conflicting results? Many of the studies supporting soy’s health benefits have taken place in Asian countries where people eat more fermented soy products (miso, tempeh, etc.). Those in Europe and North America tend to consume unfermented and highly processed soy products, many of which contain trans fats and artificial additives, and to eat soy protein in larger quantities, so health outcomes are bound to differ. Soy is considered a health food for a number of reasons. One cup of… read more